All About Cooktops: Gas, Induction and Electric Cooktops

October 6, 2016   /   byArs Lexis  / Categories :  The Board Room

Types of Cooktops A cooktop is one of the most essential and regularly utilised appliances in a home. Cooktops, unlike traditional stoves, they function independently from stoves and are separate from traditional ovens and ranges. They could be installed over built-in ovens or kitchen islands, provided that there’s ample power and space available, and are especially developed to integrate seamlessly with kitchen countertops for a more contemporary and clean look, explains a specialist from Hagglefree.com.au. In general, cooktops come in three types: induction, electric, and gas.

  1. Gas Cooktops

Gas cooktops have come a long way since their innovation and now come in a plethora of options — flushed with the bench top, raised, mirror or chrome finish, glass or stainless steel frame, and a wide array of burner sizes and layouts. Cast iron trivets are somewhat heavier but infinitely more durable regarding daily wear and tear and heavy cookware. When going with a gas cooktop, inform your gas fitter or plumber if you require LPG or natural gas due to the differences in jetting.

  1. Electric Cooktops

These are very user-friendly and are often the most economical of all cooktop types. Standard electric options typically feature coil or solid elements that come with some cleaning issues and slow heating and cooling times, while ceramic options have better features, such as control locks, and a more contemporary feel. The newer electric cooktop models feature digital controls and flat surfaces for easier cleaning and enhanced cooking control. However, they do tend to cycle on and off because depending on the thermostat they use.

  1. Induction Cooktops

These are the latest benchmark in stovetop technology. Induction cooktops are known to significantly decrease cooking times since they heat much quicker than other cooktop options. More importantly, because no stewing will occur, the heat won’t dissipate when you add a steak or fish to your pan. Induction technology utilises magnetic current for cooking, which means that you won’t experience heat loss because the induction cooktop will only heat up when you place a pan on top of it.

There’s a cooktop out there for you, you just have to select one that most fits your cooking requirements and budget. However, you have to do your own due diligence and research cooktop options online or in brick and mortar stores to make certain that you get the best option for you.